See new books on the following topics:

Aging -- Alzheimer's -- Anti-Aging -- Aubrey de Grey Ideas -- Biomedical Nanotechnology -- Brain Aging -- Caloric Restriction -- Cancer -- Cardiovascular Health -- Cryonics -- Dementia -- Diabetes -- Estrogen -- Genetics of Aging and Health -- Geriatrics -- Growth Hormone -- Hormones -- Human Longevity -- Immortality -- Life Expectancy -- Life Extension -- Menopause -- Mortality -- Nursing -- Population Aging -- Regenerative Medicine -- Rejuvenation -- Resveratrol -- SENS: Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence -- Stem Cell Therapy -- Supplements -- Testosterone -- Vitamins.



Aging, Longevity and Health in the News

Genes 'play role in Ebola survival'
Genetic factors could play an important role in whether people survive or die from the Ebola virus, say US scientists.

New strike by NHS staff announced
NHS workers, including nurses and midwives, are to stage a new four-hour strike in England on 24 November as part of an ongoing pay dispute.

UK national sperm bank starts work
A UK national sperm bank - charged with reversing a growing shortage of sperm - starts work in Birmingham.

Cancer survival rates 'improving'
Most people diagnosed with cancer in recent years are surviving for longer, according to the latest statistics.

Dementia tops female causes of death
Dementia is the leading cause of death for women in England and Wales, official figures show.

Google developing a cancer detector
Google is attempting to diagnose cancers, heart attack risks and other ailments with a system that combines nanoparticles and a wrist-worn sensor.

Drinking milk 'may not protect bones'
Drinking large amounts of milk may not lower the risk of bone fractures, a study in the British Medical Journal suggests.

VIDEO: UK national sperm bank starts work
A UK national sperm bank - charged with reversing a growing shortage of donor sperm - has started work in Birmingham.


[CaRP] XML error: Mismatched tag at line 7
Poison Pen: A Heart Risk in Drinking Water
Even trace amounts of arsenic in drinking water may increase the risk of heart disease, researchers have found.








The New Old Age Blog: A Workout for the Mind
Improved perceptions of aging can lead to increases in physical strength, an unusual study finds.








California?s Proposition 45 Would Offer Public a Say on Health Insurance Rates
The ballot measure would allow consumers to sue to keep costs down on individual and small group plans, even after a commissioner had approved them.


Well: Knowing Cancer Risk May Not Affect Screening Rates
Telling people of their potential increased risk of colon cancer did not spur them to get the recommended screening.








?Canada restricts visas amid Ebola scare
People from West African countries hard hit by the virus will no longer be granted visas to enter Canada, government says

Oregon teen develops a way to detect cancer early
A Portland, Oregon, 14-year-old has developed a way to detect cancer sooner, and as a reward he just won a national prize and even had a planet named after him. KOIN's Kohr Harlan reports.

Can your mental attitude reverse the effects of aging?
In studies over four decades, Harvard psychology professor Ellen Langer showed that mental attitude can reverse the effects of again and improve physical health. Now she wants to test the theory on cancer. Dr. Langer joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss her research.

Maine Gov.: Police are there to protect Kaci Hickox
Speaking to WSCH-TV, Maine Governor Paul LePage says Kaci Hickox is free to come out of her home, but that he doesn't want anyone to get within three feet of her, citing possible infection concerns.








Can a Class Shake Off the Effects of Social Media?
A class called ?Alone Together: Finding Intimacy in the Age of Facebook? aims to explore the effects of social media ? sometimes by giving it up.








Brittany Maynard May Stay Longer Than Planned, She Says
Brittany Maynard is leaving her exit door open just a crack, allowing that she may live beyond Saturday, she said in a video released Wednesday night.








Nearly 50 Ebola Volunteers Returned Safely From Hot Zone
Close to 50 volunteers have come back safe and well from the Ebola hot zone in West Africa, aid agencies tell NBC News








Mini-Stomachs Let Scientists Study Ulcers in a Lab Dish
Scientists have grown miniature stomachs in a lab dish using stem cells, and are already using them to study stomach cancer.









[CaRP] XML error: Mismatched tag at line 45

[CaRP] XML error: Undeclared entity error at line 15
Is Tau the 'How' Behind Alzheimer's?
When this protein malfunctions, brain cells die, say researchers working with mice

Adult Asthma Linked to Higher Dementia Risk
People with asthma, particularly older ones, face a greater risk of getting dementia, a new study suggests.

Almost 1 in 5 Americans Plagued by Constant Pain, Survey Suggests
Older people, women more likely to struggle on daily basis, researchers note

Eczema Tied to Bone Fracture Risk in Study
Risk was small; distractions caused by itch and sleep problems are possible factors, experts say

Pill Would Detect Cancer in Early Stages: Google
Hi-Tech Pill Would Detect Cancer in Early Stages: Google

Is Milk Your Friend or Foe?
Instead of reduction in fractures, study suggests higher risk of heart disease, cancer

Brain Injuries in Older Age Could Boost Dementia Risk, Study Finds
Active seniors should take measures to protect their head, expert says

Type 1 Diabetes Increasing Among White American Kids
Children 5 to 9 years old hardest hit, study finds

Himalayan Viagra fuels caterpillar fungus gold rush
Overwhelmed by speculators trying to cash-in on a prized medicinal fungus known as Himalayan Viagra, two isolated Tibetan communities have managed to do at the local level what world leaders often fail to do on a global scale -- implement a successful system for the sustainable harvest of a precious natural resource, suggests new research.

Lord of the microrings
Researchers report a significant breakthrough in laser technology with the development of a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing on demand. This advance holds ramifications for a wide range of optoelectronic applications including metrology and interferometry, data storage and communications, and high-resolution spectroscopy.

Heart's own immune cells can help it heal
The heart holds its own pool of immune cells capable of helping it heal after injury, according to new research. In a mouse model of heart failure, the researchers showed that blocking the bone marrow's macrophages from entering the heart protects the organ's beneficial pool of macrophages, allowing them to remain in the heart, where they promote regeneration and recovery. The findings may have implications for treating heart failure in humans.

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders prevalence in U.S. revealed by study
Nearly 5 percent of U.S. children may be affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), according to a new study. FASD are a group of conditions that can occur in the children of mothers who drank alcohol during pregnancy. Characteristics are both physical and cognitive and can include abnormal facial features, smaller-than-average physical growth, poor coordination, learning disabilities and vision and hearing problems.

Biology meets geometry: Geometry of a common cellular structure explored
Architecture imitates life, at least when it comes to those spiral ramps in multistory parking garages. Stacked and connecting parallel levels, the ramps are replications of helical structures found in a ubiquitous membrane structure in the cells of the body.

Harnessing error-prone chips
As transistors get smaller, they also grow less reliable. Increasing their operating voltage can help, but that means a corresponding increase in power consumption. With information technology consuming a steadily growing fraction of the world's energy supplies, some researchers and hardware manufacturers are exploring the possibility of simply letting chips botch the occasional computation. In many popular applications -- video rendering, for instance -- users probably wouldn't notice the diffe...

Emerging disease could wipe out American, European salamanders
A fungal disease from Asia wiped out salamanders in parts of Europe and will likely reach the US through the international wildlife trade in Asian newts sold as pets, say US experts. Scientists report the fungus arose in Asia 30 million years ago and is lethal to many European and American newt species. It has not yet been found in North American wild amphibians.

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine
Researchers have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine?s significant obstacles.

What do American babies eat? A lot depends on Mom's socioeconomic background
Dietary patterns of babies vary according to the racial, ethnic and educational backgrounds of their mothers, pediatrics researchers have found. For example, babies whose diet included more breastfeeding and solid foods that adhere to infant guidelines from international and pediatric organizations were associated with higher household income -- generally above $60,000 per year -- and mothers with higher educational levels ranging from some college to post-graduate education.

Making lab-grown tissues stronger
Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments. Cartilage, for example, is a hard material that caps the ends of bones and allows joints to work smoothly. Biomedical engineers are exploring ways to toughen up engineered cartilage and keep natural tissues strong outside the body.

Young adults ages 18 to 26 should be viewed as separate subpopulation in poli...
Young adults ages 18-26 should be viewed as a separate subpopulation in policy and research, because they are in a critical period of development when successes or failures could strongly affect the trajectories of their lives, says a new report.

Could daylight savings time be a risk to diabetics?
Many will turn back the hands of time as part of the twice-annual ritual of daylight savings time. That means remembering to change the alarm clock next to the bed, which means an extra hour of sleep before getting up in the morning. But for some diabetics who use insulin pumps, researchers suggest that remembering to change the time on this device should be the priority.

Sadness lasts longer than other emotions
Why is it that you can feel sad up to 240 times longer than you do feeling ashamed, surprised, irritated or even bored? It's because sadness often goes hand in hand with events of greater impact such as death or accidents. You need more time to mull over and cope with what happened to fully comprehend it, say researchers. This is the first work to provide clear evidence to explain why some emotions last a longer time than others.

Why scratching makes you itch more
Turns out your mom was right: scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research reveals that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation. Scientists uncovered serotonin's role in controlling pain decades ago, but this is the first time the release of the chemical messenger from the brain has been linked to itch, they say.

Clock gene dysregulation may explain overactive bladder
If you think sleep problems and bladder problems are a fact of life in old age, you may be right. A new report shows that our sleep-wake cycles are genetically connected to our bladder, and disruptions to one may cause problems with the other.

Size matters: Baby's size at birth may predict risk for disease later in life
Being overweight might be better in the long term than being underweight, at least when it comes to infants. "These findings support the hypothesis that common long-term variation in the activity of genes established in the womb may underpin links between size at birth and risk for adult disease," said one of the authors.

BPA exposure by infants may increase later risk of food intolerance
Scientists show, for the first time, that there is a link between perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) at low doses and the risk to develop food intolerance in later life. "We may look back one day and see BPA exposure as one of the more important public health problems of our time," said one expert. "We know that too much exposure is bad, but exactly how much exposure is too much is still up for debate."

Active, biodegradable packaging for oily products
The increase in the presence of plastic in our lives is an unstoppable trend due to the versatility of this material. So innovation in the packaging industry has been focusing on the development of new, more sustainable, economically viable materials with enhanced properties and which also perform the functions required by this sector: to contain, protect and preserve the product, to inform the consumer about it and to facilitate the distribution of it. Now, a single-layer, biodegradable contain...

Device developed for running shoes that prevents injuries
A prototype running shoe has been designed with an integrated device that improves training management and prevents injuries. The device consists of a microelectronic measuring system capable of gathering biomechanical parameters that characterize the runner's technique during a race. This information is wirelessly transmitted to the runner's mobile phone and a mobile phone application provides real-time feedback, including level of performance and suggestions to change the running pattern or to...

Clinical practice guidelines address multimodality treatment for esophageal c...
New clinical practice guidelines for treating cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (area where the esophagus meets the stomach) have been released. The guidelines include nine evidence-based recommendations that address issues related to multimodality care, including neoadjuvant therapy (chemotherapy and radiation therapy given prior to surgery). The goal of this therapy is to reduce the extent of cancer before an operation to maximize the chance of obtaining a cure.

Can parents make their kids smarter?
Reading bedtime stories, engaging in conversation and eating nightly dinners together are all positive ways in which parents interact with their children, but according to new research, none of these actions have any detectable influence on children's intelligence later in life. A criminology professor examined a nationally representative sample of youth alongside a sample of adopted children and found evidence to support the argument that IQ is not the result of parental socialization.

Bat influenza viruses unlikely to pose a threat to human health
Veterinary researchers have completed new research that suggests the bat influence virus poses a low risk to humans.

Reef-builders with a sense of harmony
Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. Scientists have made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.

Pterostilbene, a molecule similar to resveratrol, as a potential treatment fo...
Pterostilbene is a phenolic compound in the same family as resveratrol and is present in small amounts in a large variety of foods and beverages like blueberries or red wine. Researchers have observed in animal models that its administration reduces the build-up of body fat, which could reduce the risk of developing other diseases like diabetes.

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufactu...
What does it take to fabricate electronic and medical devices tinier than a fraction of a human hair? Nanoengineers recently invented a new method of lithography in which nanoscale robots swim over the surface of light-sensitive material to create complex surface patterns that form the sensors and electronics components on nanoscale devices.

National initiative shows multisystem approaches to reduce diabetes disparities
Exciting results from an innovative, multicultural, five-year initiative, known as the Alliance to Reduce Disparities in Diabetes, have been published, revealing that a new model of chronic disease management for vulnerable populations with diabetes shows significant promise in strengthening coordination of care, reducing diabetes health disparities and improving health outcomes.

Ebola Worries Ease a Bit Despite Preparedness Concerns
Ebola worries have eased slightly in the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll, despite a broad sense among Americans that their local hospitals are unprepared to deal with the virus ??? and continued preference for a more robust response by the federal government. After the difficulties...

Chicago Photojournalist Monitored For Ebola After Return From Liberia
Marcus DiPaola returned to the U.S. from Monrovia, Liberia, on Oct. 20. Since he returned, he has been monitoring himself for a fever by taking his temperature every hour. He has yet to show any symptoms of Ebola. Two nurses from the Chicago Department of Public Health visited his home Wednesday to check on him.

Attorneys: Millions Of Dollars Flowed As Doctor Ordered Needless Heart Proced...
More than two dozen people are now suing an Indiana cardiologist and hospital, claiming they went under the knife unnecessarily. CBS 2's Dana Kozlov reports.

More Lawsuits Filed Against Ind. Doctor For Unnecessary Heart Procedures
The latest lawsuits against cardiologist Arvind Gandhi were filed Monday, and attorneys expect even more people to come forward. CBS 2?s Dana Kozlov reports.

Experts Question Need For Mandatory Ebola Quarantines
National health experts have suggested mandatory quarantines are unnecessary, and could limit medical workers? ability to help fight the spread of Ebola.

Matter: From Ancient DNA, a Clearer Picture of Europeans Today
New studies of genomes thousands of years old have allowed scientists to see bits of history playing out over time, revealing that Europeans today have genes from three very different populations.








Forecasts: How Confirmation Bias Can Lead to a Spinning of Wheels
Being a better forecaster means setting aside emotion and being more cold and calculating.


Political Memo: Why Republicans Keep Telling Everyone They?re Not Scientists
The refrain is a stopgap between two politically untenable positions: the denial of climate change and the embrace of policies to address it.


Unease Lingers in the Bronx Despite a Boy?s Negative Ebola Test
Doubts and anxiety persist for neighbors in the 5-year-old boy?s building, with some suspicious that the test results are not accurate.










































Further reading: