See new books on the following topics:

Aging -- Alzheimer's -- Anti-Aging -- Aubrey de Grey Ideas -- Biomedical Nanotechnology -- Brain Aging -- Caloric Restriction -- Cancer -- Cardiovascular Health -- Cryonics -- Dementia -- Diabetes -- Estrogen -- Genetics of Aging and Health -- Geriatrics -- Growth Hormone -- Hormones -- Human Longevity -- Immortality -- Life Expectancy -- Life Extension -- Menopause -- Mortality -- Nursing -- Population Aging -- Regenerative Medicine -- Rejuvenation -- Resveratrol -- SENS: Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence -- Stem Cell Therapy -- Supplements -- Testosterone -- Vitamins.



Aging, Longevity and Health in the News

Pubic hair grooming 'STI risk linked to skin tears'
People who regularly trim or remove all their pubic hair are at greater risk of STIs, research suggests.

Margaret and Angus Mayer's family raise dementia care concerns
A family criticises social services following the deaths of an elderly couple, saying their father struggled to care for their mother with Alzheimer's.

Rochdale woman, 102, has life-saving cancer surgery
A great-grandmother has life-saving cancer surgery - at the age of 102, and without a general anaesthetic.


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Children?s Headphones May Carry Risk of Hearing Loss
Half of 30 sets of so-called noise-limiting headphones and earbuds tested did not restrict volume as much as their manufacturers promised.

Can You Get Too Much Protein?
While some nutritionists have encouraged the protein craze, a number of experts are urging caution.

Personal Health: Cold Hands May Signal Raynaud?s Phenomenon
The condition, affecting up to 5 percent of the population, is uncomfortable but not necessarily dangerous.

The New Old Age: Older Adults Are Still Skipping Vaccinations
People once vigilant about immunizing their children aren?t nearly as careful about protecting themselves as they age.

Does Gene Testing Spur Healthier Habits? Maybe Not
Those told they were at high genetic risk for diabetes did not eat better or exercise more.

Well: Can You Regain Muscle Mass After Age 60?
Men and women in their 60s and 70s can build muscles that are as strong as a 40-year-old?s, though the process of bulking up works differently in older people than in the young.

Missing just a couple of hours of sleep doubles car crash risk
A new report from AAA sheds light on just how dangerous sleep deprivation? can be

Few hours less sleep could increase driver's crash risk
New research shows how deadly it can be to drive when you're tired. A AAA study finds drivers who miss two to three hours of sleep a day more than quadruple their risk of getting in a crash. Errol Barnett reports on why federal regulators say the accident risk from drowsy driving is comparable to driving drunk.

Stuttering mysteries unfold in brain imaging study
Findings provide a road map to help develop treatments for stuttering, researcher says

Even occasional cigarette smoking can be deadly
Smoking just one cigarette a day significantly increases risk of death, a new report finds

Football position linked to blood pressure, heart issues
These "300-pound behemoths" on a college team may face health issues more commonly found in middle-age and older adults

Otters offering different form of therapy
At a California animal sanctuary, otters and children are swimming together. But this isn't just a cute romp in the pool, it's a form of therapy. Chris Martinez explains.

Sleepy Drivers as Dangerous as Drunk Drivers
Even missing a couple of hours of sleep can double your risk of a crash, a new story finds.

Gut Germs May Affect Parkinson's, Study Finds
The bacteria and other germs living inside a person's digestive system may affect symptoms of Parkinson's disease, researchers reported Thursday.


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Children?s Headphones May Carry Risk of Hearing Loss
Half of 30 sets of so-called noise-limiting headphones and earbuds tested did not restrict volume as much as their manufacturers promised.

Can You Get Too Much Protein?
While some nutritionists have encouraged the protein craze, a number of experts are urging caution.

Personal Health: Cold Hands May Signal Raynaud?s Phenomenon
The condition, affecting up to 5 percent of the population, is uncomfortable but not necessarily dangerous.

The New Old Age: Older Adults Are Still Skipping Vaccinations
People once vigilant about immunizing their children aren?t nearly as careful about protecting themselves as they age.

Does Gene Testing Spur Healthier Habits? Maybe Not
Those told they were at high genetic risk for diabetes did not eat better or exercise more.

Well: Can You Regain Muscle Mass After Age 60?
Men and women in their 60s and 70s can build muscles that are as strong as a 40-year-old?s, though the process of bulking up works differently in older people than in the young.

[In Depth] Energy pulses reveal possible new state of memory
Memory researchers have shone light into a cognitive limbo. A new memory?the name of someone you've just met, for example?is held for seconds in so-called working memory, as your brain's neurons continue to fire. If the person is important to you, the name will over a few days enter your long-term memory, preserved by permanently altered neural connections. But where does it go during the in-between hours, when it has left your standard working memory and is not yet embedded in long-term memory?...

[Feature] Quest for qubits
Building a quantum computer has gone from a far-off dream of a few university scientists to an immediate goal for some of the world's biggest companies. Tech giants Intel, Microsoft, IBM, and Google are all plowing tens of millions of dollars into quantum computing, which aims to harness quantum mechanics to vastly accelerate computation. Yet the contenders are betting on different technological horses: No one yet knows what type of quantum logic bit, or qubit, will power a practical quantum com...

[Feature] Bringing legends to life
Using ancient DNA techniques, geneticist Li Hui of Fudan University in Shanghai, China, hopes to demonstrate that some cherished Chinese myths are grounded in reality. His current passion is an exploration of the Three Sovereigns. Chinese credit the legendary sage-kings with laying the foundations of their culture: inventing silk and medicine, for instance, and fashioning China's written characters. Li says he has gleaned support for the Three Sovereigns legend from a vast database of DNA sample...

[Perspective] Spying on the neighbors' pool
The structure and properties of the proton in water are of fundamental importance in many areas of chemistry and biology. The high mobility of the proton in an aqueous solution is understood in terms of its ?hopping? between neighboring water molecules, as suggested by the two-century-old Grotthuss mechanism. The barrier for this process intimately depends on the proton's surrounding environment, which is manifested by the connectivity of the immediate hydrogen-bonding network as well as its dyn...

[Perspective] Galaxy formation through cosmic recycling
Extremely massive galaxies are seen in the young universe, but their presence is puzzling because we do not yet understand how they became so massive so quickly. How do they get enough fuel to form stars so rapidly? The raw fuel for forming stars is cold molecular gas, and although this gas is common within young galaxies (1), we do not know how it is replenished once the first reservoirs are converted into stars. On page 1128 of this issue, Emonts et al. (2) report observations that may provide...

[Perspective] Metabolic cues for hematopoietic stem cells
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are at the helm of the hierarchically organized hematopoietic system that ensures the lifelong production of all blood cells. HSCs depend on metabolic cues to secure their protective quiescent status and to enable rapid activation and replenishment of the blood system in response to stressful situations such as infections, excessive bleeding, or chemotherapy-induced myeloablation (1?3). On pages 1156 and 1152 of this issue, Ito et al. (4) and Taya et al. (5), resp...

[Perspective] Can T cells be too exhausted to fight back?
When T cells are persistently activated by antigen, such as during chronic infection or in cancer, they can become functionally incapable of performing their effector activities, a condition called T cell exhaustion. Exhaustion therefore thwarts optimal immune control of infection and tumors. There is a need to learn more about the molecular factors that drive T cell exhaustion and just how malleable T cell immunity is once exhaustion is established. On pages 1165 and 1160 of this issue, Sen et ...

[Perspective] When stop makes sense
In the age of computational biology, it is easy to envision the genetic code as a set of immutable instructions that the cell follows without exception. The recent discovery of ciliate (1, 2) and trypanosomatid (3) species in which all three stop codons, which normally act to terminate protein translation by the ribosome, encode amino acids instead is a reminder that decoding the information in messenger RNA (mRNA) depends on molecular factors that we do not entirely understand. In these organis...

[Essay] Trial and error
We are all prediction-making machines. Granted, our predictions are often wrong?as the old saying goes, ?It's tough to make predictions?especially about the future.? But even wrong predictions serve a purpose: They help us learn. Each time we make a choice, we predict the outcome of that choice. When the outcome matches our prediction, there is no need to learn. When the outcome is unexpected, however, we update our predictions, hoping to do better next time. Author: Neir Eshel

[Essay] Retracing embryological fate
Mammalian development is a beautifully orchestrated process of cell division and differentiation during which the various cell lineages arise that form an organism. The precise nature, origin, and fate of these lineages remain a mystery in humans and in other mammals. In addition to illuminating fundamental developmental biology, mapping human cell lineages may offer insights into a range of physiological and pathological processes, such as stem cell development, congenital diseases, and childho...

[Research Article] Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD meas...
Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. We built a global model of aerosol formation by using extensive laboratory measurements of rates of nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and organic compounds conducted in the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leav...

[Report] Quantized Faraday and Kerr rotation and axion electrodynamics of a 3...
Topological insulators have been proposed to be best characterized as bulk magnetoelectric materials that show response functions quantized in terms of fundamental physical constants. Here, we lower the chemical potential of three-dimensional (3D) Bi2Se3 films to ~30 meV above the Dirac point and probe their low-energy electrodynamic response in the presence of magnetic fields with high-precision time-domain terahertz polarimetry. For fields higher than 5 tesla, we observed quantized Faraday and...

[Report] Molecular gas in the halo fuels the growth of a massive cluster gala...
The largest galaxies in the universe reside in galaxy clusters. Using sensitive observations of carbon monoxide, we show that the Spiderweb galaxy?a massive galaxy in a distant protocluster?is forming from a large reservoir of molecular gas. Most of this molecular gas lies between the protocluster galaxies and has low velocity dispersion, indicating that it is part of an enriched intergalactic medium. This may constitute the reservoir of gas that fuels the widespread star formation seen in earli...

[Report] Spectroscopic snapshots of the proton-transfer mechanism in water
The Grotthuss mechanism explains the anomalously high proton mobility in water as a sequence of proton transfers along a hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) network. However, the vibrational spectroscopic signatures of this process are masked by the diffuse nature of the key bands in bulk water. Here we report how the much simpler vibrational spectra of cold, composition-selected heavy water clusters, D+(D2O)n, can be exploited to capture clear markers that encode the collective reaction coordinate along...

[Report] Reactivation of latent working memories with transcranial magnetic s...
The ability to hold information in working memory is fundamental for cognition. Contrary to the long-standing view that working memory depends on sustained, elevated activity, we present evidence suggesting that humans can hold information in working memory via ?activity-silent? synaptic mechanisms. Using multivariate pattern analyses to decode brain activity patterns, we found that the active representation of an item in working memory drops to baseline when attention shifts away. A targeted pu...

[Report] Gliogenic LTP spreads widely in nociceptive pathways
Learning and memory formation involve long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength. A fundamental feature of LTP induction in the brain is the need for coincident pre- and postsynaptic activity. This restricts LTP expression to activated synapses only (homosynaptic LTP) and leads to its input specificity. In the spinal cord, we discovered a fundamentally different form of LTP that is induced by glial cell activation and mediated by diffusible, extracellular messengers, including d-serine an...

[Report] Epigenetic stability of exhausted T cells limits durability of reinv...
Blocking Programmed Death?1 (PD-1) can reinvigorate exhausted CD8 T cells (TEX) and improve control of chronic infections and cancer. However, whether blocking PD-1 can reprogram TEX into durable memory T cells (TMEM) is unclear. We found that reinvigoration of TEX in mice by PD-L1 blockade caused minimal memory development. After blockade, reinvigorated TEX became reexhausted if antigen concentration remained high and failed to become TMEM upon antigen clearance. TEX acquired an epigenetic prof...

[Business Office Feature] Webinar | Characterizing the maternal immune envir...
Under normal conditions, the maternal immune system is uniquely regulated during pregnancy to maintain a pathogen-free, yet noninflammatory environment for the developing fetus. However, factors such as cytokines and chemokines produced during gestation can have developmental consequences for the fetus. In particular, maternal immune dysregulation during pregnancy has been frequently associated with increased risk of autism spectrum disorders. This webinar will discuss the relationship between t...

Rare Infant Seizure Disorder Often Missed
Parents, doctors may not recognize infantile spasms early enough to prevent brain damage, study finds

Missing 1 Hour of Sleep May Double Car Crash Risk
Too little shut-eye can equal alcohol in terms of impairment behind the wheel, traffic safety group warns

Pubic Grooming Tied to Higher STD Rates
Study finds unexpected risk comes from baring all

Just 1 Cigarette a Day Can Be Deadly: Study
Light smokers still faced an increased risk of early death

11 Percent of Stroke Survivors Struggle With Epilepsy
Study found those who suffered more brain damage were more likely to have seizures afterwards

Cancer Rates Up More Than a Third in Past Decade
Researchers cite population aging and growth


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