See new books on the following topics:

Aging -- Alzheimer's -- Anti-Aging -- Aubrey de Grey Ideas -- Biomedical Nanotechnology -- Brain Aging -- Caloric Restriction -- Cancer -- Cardiovascular Health -- Cryonics -- Dementia -- Diabetes -- Estrogen -- Genetics of Aging and Health -- Geriatrics -- Growth Hormone -- Hormones -- Human Longevity -- Immortality -- Life Expectancy -- Life Extension -- Menopause -- Mortality -- Nursing -- Population Aging -- Regenerative Medicine -- Rejuvenation -- Resveratrol -- SENS: Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence -- Stem Cell Therapy -- Supplements -- Testosterone -- Vitamins.



Aging, Longevity and Health in the News

Angelina Jolie gene testing for all?
Testing everyone for cancer risk genes would save lives and is cost effective say doctors.

Chemistry 'Van Gogh' could help with cancer
Scientists capture "incredible" images of instructions contained in DNA being read

NHS 'haemorrhaging' nurses as 33,000 leave each year
More than one in 10 leave the NHS in England every year, enough to staff more than 20 hospitals.

Cost legacy of decades-old NHS blunders begins to rise
Experts say maternity wards are still making the same "avoidable errors".

Employers urged to 'normalise' menopause in the workplace
A BBC survey found 70% of women did not tell their employers about their menopause symptoms.

'Being a teenage mother is so lonely'
New guidelines aim to cut UK teenage pregnancy rates which remain among the highest in Europe.

The choir helping people with dementia
"He comes alive when he's here."

Beads of Courage
Children undergoing cancer treatment receive beads to document their journey and one mum wants to expand the scheme.

Repeated hits, not concussions, cause CTE, study finds
The neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy can start early and without any signs of concussion, according a study released Thursday.

Breakfasts that keep you fuller longer
What you eat in the morning can affect how much you consume the rest of the day. Nutritionist Lisa Drayer breaks down your best bets for breakfast.

Boy dies after contact with rabid bat
A 6-year-old Florida boy died after he came in contact with a bat and contracted the rabies virus.

Six teen suicides in six months in one Ohio district
Late last week, Hayden Porter, a 15-year-old freshman at a high school in Ohio, took his life. He was the sixth current or former teenage student from the school district to kill themselves within the past six months.

Sore throat remedies: How to soothe a sore throat
Fight your sore throat with some common sense remedies.

Holding a sneeze blew a hole in a man's throat
If you are about to sneeze -- even if you are in a quiet place -- doctors would advise you to let it rip. A 34-year-old unnamed man in Britain learned that lesson the hard way and had to spend two weeks in the hospital due to his resulting injury. That's according to a case report with the cringe-inducing title "Snap, crackle and pop: when sneezing leads to crackling in the neck." The report was published Monday in the medical journal BMJ Case Reports.

Fugu blowfish fail sparks emergency warning in Japan city
A Japanese city issued an emergency alert to residents Monday after two people ate potentially dangerous portions of fugu fish that should not have been sold.

The proven health benefits of honey
Honey is touted as a natural healing agent for dozens of conditions, but how much of that is based on fact?

75% of India's air pollution-related deaths are rural
Rural Indians, who make up about two-thirds of the country of 1.3 billion people, are disproportionately at risk of breathing polluted air, according to new research.


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Treatment Offers Hope for Imprisoned California Siblings
Cases of children isolated and abused by parents are rare but not unheard-of, say experts. Many recover.

Reproductive Factors in Women Tied to Heart Disease and Stroke Risk
Early menarche, early menopause and miscarriage were among the factors associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

: When States Add Paperwork, Even Eligible People Lose Medicaid
Kentucky?s new Medicaid waiver will ask low-income people to jump over hurdles to keep their coverage. Evidence suggests that many will fail.

Breast-Feeding Tied to Reduced Risk of Diabetes
Mothers who breast-feed may be at reduced risk of diabetes, a new study reports.

Economic Scene: Making Medicaid a Tool for Moral Education May Let Some Die
There is a precedent for letting states impose work requirements on the poor for medical coverage. It bodes ill for public health.

After a Debacle, How California Became a Role Model on Measles
Changing minds on vaccination is very difficult, but it isn?t so important when a law can change behavior.

The New Health Care: Still Not Convinced You Need a Flu Shot? First, It?s Not...
Adults also need to get vaccinated to provide herd immunity for others, especially babies and older people.

She Ran From the Cut, and Helped Thousands of Other Girls Escape, Too
Nice Leng?ete started a program in Kenya to create new rites of passage to replace female genital cutting and has helped 15,000 girls avoid the ritual.


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Could you pass the mental test Trump took?
Trump took the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), designed as a screening tool for the loss of clear thinking that sometimes precedes dementia.

Counting time, not calories can lead to weight loss
Time-restricted feeding, or TRF, is an increasingly studied diet that researchers believe may be a tool for weight-loss, diabetes prevention and even longevity.

'Minister for loneliness' appointed to fight isolation in Britain
One in ten people said they felt lonely "always or often," and hundreds of thousands of elderly people said they hadn't spoken to a friend or relative in weeks.


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Treatment Offers Hope for Imprisoned California Siblings
Cases of children isolated and abused by parents are rare but not unheard-of, say experts. Many recover.

Reproductive Factors in Women Tied to Heart Disease and Stroke Risk
Early menarche, early menopause and miscarriage were among the factors associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

: When States Add Paperwork, Even Eligible People Lose Medicaid
Kentucky?s new Medicaid waiver will ask low-income people to jump over hurdles to keep their coverage. Evidence suggests that many will fail.

Breast-Feeding Tied to Reduced Risk of Diabetes
Mothers who breast-feed may be at reduced risk of diabetes, a new study reports.

Economic Scene: Making Medicaid a Tool for Moral Education May Let Some Die
There is a precedent for letting states impose work requirements on the poor for medical coverage. It bodes ill for public health.

After a Debacle, How California Became a Role Model on Measles
Changing minds on vaccination is very difficult, but it isn?t so important when a law can change behavior.

The New Health Care: Still Not Convinced You Need a Flu Shot? First, It?s Not...
Adults also need to get vaccinated to provide herd immunity for others, especially babies and older people.

She Ran From the Cut, and Helped Thousands of Other Girls Escape, Too
Nice Leng?ete started a program in Kenya to create new rites of passage to replace female genital cutting and has helped 15,000 girls avoid the ritual.

Serious damage by soluble tau

The value of scaffolds

Quantum liquid droplets in a mixture of Bose-Einstein condensates

Quantum droplets are small clusters of atoms self-bound by the balance of attractive and repulsive forces. Here, we report on the observation of droplets solely stabilized by contact interactions in a mixture of two Bose-Einstein condensates. We demonstrate that they are several orders of magnitude more dilute than liquid helium by directly measuring their size and density via in situ imaging. We show that the droplets are stablized against collapse by quantum fluctuations and that they require ...



Improving refugee integration through data-driven algorithmic assignment

Developed democracies are settling an increased number of refugees, many of whom face challenges integrating into host societies. We developed a flexible data-driven algorithm that assigns refugees across resettlement locations to improve integration outcomes. The algorithm uses a combination of supervised machine learning and optimal matching to discover and leverage synergies between refugee characteristics and resettlement sites. The algorithm was tested on historical registry data from two c...



Dicer uses distinct modules for recognizing dsRNA termini

Invertebrates rely on Dicer to cleave viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and Drosophila Dicer-2 distinguishes dsRNA substrates by their termini. Blunt termini promote processive cleavage, while 3' overhanging termini are cleaved distributively. To understand this discrimination, we used cryo–electron microscopy to solve structures of Drosophila Dicer-2 alone and in complex with blunt dsRNA. Whereas the Platform-PAZ domains have been considered the only Dicer domains that bind dsRNA termini...



Toward dynamic structural biology: Two decades of single-molecule För...

Classical structural biology can only provide static snapshots of biomacromolecules. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) paved the way for studying dynamics in macromolecular structures under biologically relevant conditions. Since its first implementation in 1996, smFRET experiments have confirmed previously hypothesized mechanisms and provided new insights into many fundamental biological processes, such as DNA maintenance and repair, transcription, translation, ...



Obamacare Led to Rise in Breast Cancer Screening
After the rule went into effect, the study found, the number of women in Medicare Advantage plans who got mammography screening rose by 5.5 percentage points: from just under 60 percent in the two years before the rule, to 65.4 percent in the two years after.

Could a Blood Test Spot Early Stage Colon Cancer?
The test detects so-called "circulating tumor cells" (CTCs). Researchers tested it on 620 people in Taiwan who were scheduled for a routine colonoscopy at a local hospital.

Grind Your Teeth at Night? Botox Might Help
The condition, called bruxism, can lead to pain, headaches, jaw problems and damaged teeth.

Cycling Won't Sabotage a Man's Sex Life: Study
The new research on men surveyed 2,774 cyclists, 539 swimmers and 789 runners. All completed several research-validated questionnaires about sexual health, prostate symptoms, urinary tract infections, genital numbness and saddle sores, among other factors.

Jane Fonda Has Cancerous Growth Removed From Lip
The 80-year-old downplayed the situation and noted that she received a clean bill of health, NBC News reported.

FDA Works to Ease Storm-related IV Bag Shortage
The agency is also monitoring the recent practice of filling new, but empty, IV bags with fluids to deal with the shortage.

Breast-Feed Now, Stave Off Diabetes Later
In babies, breast-feeding has been linked to a reduced risk for infections, type 1 and type 2 diabetes, some cancers and childhood overweight and obesity.

Sauna May Be as Good as Exercise for the Heart
On average, the study found, sauna users saw a drop in blood pressure and artery "stiffness" immediately after their heat bath. They also showed an increase in heart rate that was similar to the effect from moderate exercise.

Hold That Sneeze? Maybe Not
Spontaneous rupture of the back of the throat is rare and usually caused by trauma, explained the authors of the report, published Jan. 15.


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Trilobites: Being Antisocial Leads to a Longer Life. For Marmots.
Unlike most mammals, yellow-bellied marmots with more active social lives died younger than those that kept to themselves, scientists found after tracking them for 13 years.

Prague Journal: One of the World?s Oldest Clocks Stops Ticking, Briefly
The Astronomical Clock in Prague has been taken apart for maintenance. The city?s clock master has until August to finish restoring it.

Treatment Offers Hope for Imprisoned California Siblings
Cases of children isolated and abused by parents are rare but not unheard-of, say experts. Many recover.

After a Debacle, How California Became a Role Model on Measles
Changing minds on vaccination is very difficult, but it isn?t so important when a law can change behavior.



































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