See new books on the following topics:

Aging -- Alzheimer's -- Anti-Aging -- Aubrey de Grey Ideas -- Biomedical Nanotechnology -- Brain Aging -- Caloric Restriction -- Cancer -- Cardiovascular Health -- Cryonics -- Dementia -- Diabetes -- Estrogen -- Genetics of Aging and Health -- Geriatrics -- Growth Hormone -- Hormones -- Human Longevity -- Immortality -- Life Expectancy -- Life Extension -- Menopause -- Mortality -- Nursing -- Population Aging -- Regenerative Medicine -- Rejuvenation -- Resveratrol -- SENS: Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence -- Stem Cell Therapy -- Supplements -- Testosterone -- Vitamins.



Aging, Longevity and Health in the News

'Don't go cold turkey' to quit smoking
The annual Stoptober campaign launches with a warning to seek help when trying to kick the habit.

Yoghurts (even organic ones) 'full of sugar'
Public told not to be lulled into thinking yoghurts are as healthy as many assume.

Hiding my psychosis for 10 years from the age of 12
Luke Watkin first experienced psychosis at 12 years old - he didn't talk about it for a decade.

Bedside light tool could detect baby brain injury earlier
A new bedside tool can detect brain damage by measuring oxygen and energy levels using light.

Targeted treatment for melanoma to be free on NHS
Trials showed the risk of the cancer returning after surgery was reduced with the therapy.

Kavanaugh's accuser says he was drunk at the time. What studies say about alc...
Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the woman who has accused him of physical and sexual assault, California professor Christine Blasey Ford, have indicated a willingness to testify about the allegations before the Senate Judiciary Committee. If they do they will likely face questions about how reliable memory can be when alcohol is involved. The science says that alcohol can play a role in memory recall depending on the amount and how much time has gone by.

Household disinfectants could be making kids overweight
Multi-surface cleaners and other commonly used household disinfectants could be making children overweight by altering the bacteria found in their guts, a new study published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal suggests.

'Male menopause,' affecting younger men
In my practice, I've noticed that an increasing number of younger guys are complaining of sexual concerns, such as diminished libido and erectile problems, more commonly seen in older men.

E-cigarette warnings to arrive in high school bathrooms nationwide
In a new push to education the nearly 11 million youth at risk of e-cigarette addiction, the FDA announced a new campaign that will take the message into high school bathrooms.

Kicked out of assisted living: What you can do
Across the country, assisted living facilities are evicting residents who have grown older and frail, essentially saying that "we can't take care of you any longer." Evictions top the list of grievances about assisted living received by long-term care ombudsmen across the U.S.

Middle-aged drinkers more concerned about reputation than health risks, study...
Middle-aged drinkers are more concerned about their embarrassing or childish behavior resulting from drinking alcohol than about the health risks associated with it, a new study has found.

Aspirin use in old age: Risks may outweigh benefits
It's one of the most well-known tenets of modern medicine: An aspirin a day keeps the doctor away. But according to a trio of studies published Sunday in the New England Journal of Medicine, a daily low-dose aspirin regimen provides no significant health benefits for healthy older adults. Instead, it may cause them serious harm.


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Adolescence: How to Help Teenagers Embrace Stress
Stretching beyond familiar limits doesn?t always feel good, but growing and learning ? the keys to school and much of life ? can?t happen any other way.

When Family Members Care for Aging Parents
My siblings and I joined the ranks of the 15 million or so unpaid and untrained family caregivers for older adults in this country.

Matter: Why Your DNA Is Still Uncharted Territory
Scientists are focusing on a relatively small number of human genes and neglecting thousands of others. The reasons have more to do with professional survival than genetics.

Daytime Sleepiness Tied to Brain Changes of Alzheimer?s
Men and women who reported feeling sleepy during the day had higher levels of brain plaques.

Living With Cancer: Raising Awareness of BRCA Mutations
Genetic testing may help those at high risk take steps to prevent deadly cancers.

Tech Fix: Apple Watch Series 4 Review: Faster, Bigger, With a Promise to Be H...
The faster speeds and larger screen sound boring on paper. But an electrical heart sensor gives a glimpse of the promise to come, our reviewer writes.

Excess Weight Gain or Loss During Pregnancy Tied to Child?s Heart Health
Women who put on excess pounds, or not enough weight, had children at risk for high blood pressure and other problems.

Merger of Cigna and Express Scripts Gets Approval From Justice Dept.
The takeover of one of the nation?s largest pharmacy benefit manager by a big health insurer is expected to close by the end of the year.

Retro Report: How an Unsolved Mystery Changed the Way We Take Pills
The origins of tamper-resistant packaging ? exasperating yet reassuring ? lie in a deadly episode in 1982, when cyanide-laced Tylenol killed seven people.

Low-Dose Aspirin Late in Life? Healthy People May Not Need It
Millions take aspirin to prevent heart attacks, strokes and cancer. New research shows older people in good health may not need it ? and should not start taking it.

Where a Sore Throat Becomes a Death Sentence
Once a year, doctors travel to Rwanda to perform lifesaving surgery on people with damaged heart valves ? a disease caused by untreated strep throat.


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Adolescence: How to Help Teenagers Embrace Stress
Stretching beyond familiar limits doesn?t always feel good, but growing and learning ? the keys to school and much of life ? can?t happen any other way.

When Family Members Care for Aging Parents
My siblings and I joined the ranks of the 15 million or so unpaid and untrained family caregivers for older adults in this country.

Matter: Why Your DNA Is Still Uncharted Territory
Scientists are focusing on a relatively small number of human genes and neglecting thousands of others. The reasons have more to do with professional survival than genetics.

Daytime Sleepiness Tied to Brain Changes of Alzheimer?s
Men and women who reported feeling sleepy during the day had higher levels of brain plaques.

Living With Cancer: Raising Awareness of BRCA Mutations
Genetic testing may help those at high risk take steps to prevent deadly cancers.

Tech Fix: Apple Watch Series 4 Review: Faster, Bigger, With a Promise to Be H...
The faster speeds and larger screen sound boring on paper. But an electrical heart sensor gives a glimpse of the promise to come, our reviewer writes.

Excess Weight Gain or Loss During Pregnancy Tied to Child?s Heart Health
Women who put on excess pounds, or not enough weight, had children at risk for high blood pressure and other problems.

Merger of Cigna and Express Scripts Gets Approval From Justice Dept.
The takeover of one of the nation?s largest pharmacy benefit manager by a big health insurer is expected to close by the end of the year.

Retro Report: How an Unsolved Mystery Changed the Way We Take Pills
The origins of tamper-resistant packaging ? exasperating yet reassuring ? lie in a deadly episode in 1982, when cyanide-laced Tylenol killed seven people.

Low-Dose Aspirin Late in Life? Healthy People May Not Need It
Millions take aspirin to prevent heart attacks, strokes and cancer. New research shows older people in good health may not need it ? and should not start taking it.

Where a Sore Throat Becomes a Death Sentence
Once a year, doctors travel to Rwanda to perform lifesaving surgery on people with damaged heart valves ? a disease caused by untreated strep throat.

Deadly storms break records, damage facilities

Cagey coordination

Unlocking P(V): Reagents for chiral phosphorothioate synthesis

Phosphorothioate nucleotides have emerged as powerful pharmacological substitutes of their native phosphodiester analogs with important translational applications in antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) therapeutics and cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) synthesis. Stereocontrolled installation of this chiral motif has long been hampered by the systemic use of phosphorus(III) [P(III)]–based reagent systems as the sole practical means of oligonucleotide assembly. A fundamentally different approach is des...



Measurement of a superconducting qubit with a microwave photon counter

Fast, high-fidelity measurement is a key ingredient for quantum error correction. Conventional approaches to the measurement of superconducting qubits, involving linear amplification of a microwave probe tone followed by heterodyne detection at room temperature, do not scale well to large system sizes. We introduce an approach to measurement based on a microwave photon counter demonstrating raw single-shot measurement fidelity of 92%. Moreover, the intrinsic damping of the photon counter is used...



Ancient steroids establish the Ediacaran fossil Dickinsonia as one of the ear...

The enigmatic Ediacara biota (571 million to 541 million years ago) represents the first macroscopic complex organisms in the geological record and may hold the key to our understanding of the origin of animals. Ediacaran macrofossils are as "strange as life on another planet" and have evaded taxonomic classification, with interpretations ranging from marine animals or giant single-celled protists to terrestrial lichens. Here, we show that lipid biomarkers extracted from organically preserved Ed...



Comment on "U-Th dating of carbonate crusts reveals Neandertal origin of Iber...

Hoffmann et al. (Reports, 23 February 2018, p. 912) report the discovery of parietal art older than 64,800 years and attributed to Neanderthals, at least 25 millennia before the oldest parietal art ever found. Instead, critical evaluation of their geochronological data seems to provide stronger support for an age of 47,000 years, which is much more consistent with the archaeological background in hand.



A gut-brain neural circuit for nutrient sensory transduction

The brain is thought to sense gut stimuli only via the passive release of hormones. This is because no connection has been described between the vagus and the putative gut epithelial sensor cell—the enteroendocrine cell. However, these electrically excitable cells contain several features of epithelial transducers. Using a mouse model, we found that enteroendocrine cells synapse with vagal neurons to transduce gut luminal signals in milliseconds by using glutamate as a neurotransmitter. Th...



Challenges for commercializing perovskite solar cells

Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have witnessed rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, together with advances in stability and upscaling. Despite these advances, their limited stability and need to prove upscaling remain crucial hurdles on the path to commercialization. We summarize recent advances toward commercially viable PSCs and discuss challenges that remain. We expound the development of standardized protocols to distinguish intrinsic and extrinsic degradation factors in perovskites. ...



Cellular checkpoint control using programmable sequential logic

Biological processes that require orderly progression, such as growth and differentiation, proceed via regulatory checkpoints where the cell waits for signals before continuing to the next state. Implementing such control would allow genetic engineers to divide complex tasks into stages. We present genetic circuits that encode sequential logic to instruct Escherichia coli to proceed through a linear or cyclical sequence of states. These are built with 11 set-reset latches, designed with represso...



Is 100 the New 80? What's It Take to Live Longer?
As more and more people live to 100, researchers want to know what separates them from those who live the average, expected 80 years. Of course exercise, a good diet, and other healthy choices key. But studies show genes are pretty important, too. So do you have to win the genetic lottery to live a whole century? Or can science unlock the secret to spreading the genetic wealth?

Mediterranean Diet May Cut Stroke Risk for Women
Women in a new study who followed a Mediterranean diet cut their risk for stroke, but the effect was not the same for men. The reason isn?t quite clear, researchers said.

Florence's Lingering Threat: Mold
Mold-related illnesses are a serious concern following severe flooding in North and South Carolina, say experts from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

Opioids Driving U.S. Life Expectancy Decline: CDC
Babies now can expect to live 78.6 years on average, based on 2016 data that's the most recent, according to NCHS researchers.

Reports Warn of Growing Senior Opioid Crisis
Millions of older Americans are now filling prescriptions for many different opioid medications at the same time, while hundreds of thousands are winding up in the hospital with opioid-related complications, according to two new government reports.

Scientists Find 500 More Genes That Influence BP
High blood pressure, which is a risk factor for stroke and heart disease, claimed almost 8 million lives around the world in 2015 alone, the researchers noted.

Could Household Cleaners Make Your Kid Fat?
Babies whose parents used "eco-friendly" cleaning products had lower odds of excess weight by age 3, the findings showed.

Infant Walkers Still Injuring Thousands of Babies
More than 230,000 children younger than 15 months old were treated in emergency rooms between 1990 and 2014 for baby walker-related injuries, new research published in the journal Pediatrics shows. More than 10,000 of those youngsters ended up being admitted to the hospital.

Study Doubts Worth of Daily Aspirin for Seniors
Daily aspirin is recommended for people between 50 and 69 if they are at increased risk of heart disease, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a guideline-setting expert panel. However, there's not been enough medical evidence to say whether aspirin would help elderly folks, the USPSTF says.


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Trilobites: On Ecstasy, Octopuses Reached Out for a Hug
By dosing the tentacled creatures with MDMA, researchers found they share parts of an ancient messaging system involved in social behaviors with humans.

Matter: Why Your DNA Is Still Uncharted Territory
Scientists are focusing on a relatively small number of human genes and neglecting thousands of others. The reasons have more to do with professional survival than genetics.

Lagoons of Pig Waste Are Overflowing After Florence. Yes, That?s as Nasty as ...
At least 110 lagoons in North Carolina have either released pig waste into the environment or are at imminent risk of doing so, according to state officials.

Merger of Cigna and Express Scripts Gets Approval From Justice Dept.
The takeover of one of the nation?s largest pharmacy benefit manager by a big health insurer is expected to close by the end of the year.

Update: A Rwandan Game Park Defying the Odds
Despite modest tourism numbers, Akagera National Park is a success story in the making, particularly considering that, like its host country, it survived catastrophe.

Retro Report: How an Unsolved Mystery Changed the Way We Take Pills
The origins of tamper-resistant packaging ? exasperating yet reassuring ? lie in a deadly episode in 1982, when cyanide-laced Tylenol killed seven people.

Low-Dose Aspirin Late in Life? Healthy People May Not Need It
Millions take aspirin to prevent heart attacks, strokes and cancer. New research shows older people in good health may not need it ? and should not start taking it.

Where a Sore Throat Becomes a Death Sentence
Once a year, doctors travel to Rwanda to perform lifesaving surgery on people with damaged heart valves ? a disease caused by untreated strep throat.



































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