See new books on the following topics:

Aging -- Alzheimer's -- Anti-Aging -- Aubrey de Grey Ideas -- Biomedical Nanotechnology -- Brain Aging -- Caloric Restriction -- Cancer -- Cardiovascular Health -- Cryonics -- Dementia -- Diabetes -- Estrogen -- Genetics of Aging and Health -- Geriatrics -- Growth Hormone -- Hormones -- Human Longevity -- Immortality -- Life Expectancy -- Life Extension -- Menopause -- Mortality -- Nursing -- Population Aging -- Regenerative Medicine -- Rejuvenation -- Resveratrol -- SENS: Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence -- Stem Cell Therapy -- Supplements -- Testosterone -- Vitamins.



Aging, Longevity and Health in the News

Common painkillers 'increase heart failure risk'
Taking a common kind of painkiller is linked to an increased risk of heart failure, a study focusing on elderly people suggests.

Young women at 'highest mental health risk'
Young women are the highest risk group in England for mental health problems, according to new data released by NHS Digital.

Caroline Aherne?s brother: ?I thought she would survive?
Caroline Aherne?s brother has told BBC Radio 5 live?s Emma Barnett that he thought his sister would survive cancer.

Professor David Nutt developed 'hangover-free' alcohol
A scientist has developed a new type of alcohol which he claims will not damage the liver or leave you with a hangover.

Teens with spots tend to stay looking younger for longer, new research suggests
Adolescents with spots tend to stay looking youthful for longer, new research suggests.


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Teaching Teenagers to Cope With Social Stress
High school students reported more confidence after completing an exercise intended to instill a basic message to help manage tension: People can change.

Critic's Notebook: The Sex-Ed Queens of YouTube Don?t Need a Ph.D.
A young online generation of advisers on sex and relationships is using the internet to get their message out. Their lack of credentials is a plus.

The 4 Traits That Put Kids at Risk for Addiction
Early trials show that personality testing can identify 90 percent of the highest risk children, targeting risky traits before they cause problems.

Children Who Get Zika After Birth Tend Not to Fall Seriously Ill, Study Finds
A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention involving teenagers and toddlers was a rare bright spot in the epidemic.

U.S. Paid Insurers Funds Meant for Treasury, Auditors Say
Federal auditors ruled that the Obama administration had violated the law by paying insurers more than allowed under the Affordable Care Act in an effort to hold down insurance premiums.

Q&A: Organic Milk Will Wait and Wait for You
A different, hotter pasteurization process helps explain why organic milk has a longer shelf life than the other stuff.

Could these common painkillers increase heart risk?
Prescription-strength NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, may increase the risk of heart failure, large study suggests

When can you stop getting colonoscopies?
Experts say colonoscopies may not be needed after 75, but age isn't the only factor

A vodka with a kick -- but also less toxic?
Bellion Vodka contains a compound that its developer claims can protect drinkers from liver damage

Can I Ever Get Pregnant? Your Questions About Zika
There are new recommendations on pregnancy, sex and the risk of Zika virus.

Boko Haram Puts Kids at Risk of Famine - UN
As many as 75,000 children will die over the next year in famine-like conditions created by Boko Haram if donors don't respond quickly, UNICEF says.

600K Vets May Go Uninsured Over Medicaid Stand: Report
More than 600,000 veterans will go without health insurance next year unless 19 states stop holding out against expanding Medicaid, researchers say.

'Destruction Is Everywhere' After 2 Hospitals Attacked
Both M2 and M10 suffered structural damage ? leaving Aleppo with just six working hospitals, only three of which have trauma centers.

Zika Virus Damage Fools Parents, Experts Say
From babies who crawl way too soon to infants who cry 24 hours a day, Zika's effects are startling the doctors treating the infected babies.


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Teaching Teenagers to Cope With Social Stress
High school students reported more confidence after completing an exercise intended to instill a basic message to help manage tension: People can change.

Critic's Notebook: The Sex-Ed Queens of YouTube Don?t Need a Ph.D.
A young online generation of advisers on sex and relationships is using the internet to get their message out. Their lack of credentials is a plus.

The 4 Traits That Put Kids at Risk for Addiction
Early trials show that personality testing can identify 90 percent of the highest risk children, targeting risky traits before they cause problems.

Children Who Get Zika After Birth Tend Not to Fall Seriously Ill, Study Finds
A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention involving teenagers and toddlers was a rare bright spot in the epidemic.

U.S. Paid Insurers Funds Meant for Treasury, Auditors Say
Federal auditors ruled that the Obama administration had violated the law by paying insurers more than allowed under the Affordable Care Act in an effort to hold down insurance premiums.

Q&A: Organic Milk Will Wait and Wait for You
A different, hotter pasteurization process helps explain why organic milk has a longer shelf life than the other stuff.

[Research Article] Pathological ?-synuclein transmission initiated by binding...
Emerging evidence indicates that the pathogenesis of Parkinson?s disease (PD) may be due to cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded preformed fibrils (PFF) of ?-synuclein (?-syn). The mechanism by which ?-syn PFF spreads from neuron to neuron is not known. Here, we show that LAG3 (lymphocyte-activation gene 3) binds ?-syn PFF with high affinity (dissociation constant = 77 nanomolar), whereas the ?-syn monomer exhibited minimal binding. ?-Syn-biotin PFF binding to LAG3 initiated ?-syn PFF endocyto...

[Editorial] The boldness of philanthropists
Last week, Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg announced their new philanthropic initiative with the goal of ?curing, preventing, and managing all diseases by the end of the century.? This may raise some eyebrows, but this effort?part of the $45 billion Chan Zuckerberg Initiative?joins forces with other philanthropists to push the envelope and support audacious ideas, with long-term commitments, to solve some of our greatest challenges. Author: David Baltimore

[Feature] Crime forecasters
Many police departments, both in the United States and abroad, have adopted or are interested in predictive policing, an approach that seeks to predict where and when crime is likely to occur or identifies people most at risk of becoming a perpetrator or a victim. Supporters say predictive policing?which uses large data sets and algorithms borrowed from fields as diverse as seismology and epidemiology?can help bring down crime rates while also reducing bias in policing. But civil liberties group...

[Perspective] Detecting structure in a protostellar disk
It is now well accepted that stars form from clouds of gas and dust that collapse under their own gravity (1). However, if all the material fell directly onto the young protostar, it would spin up so much that it would ultimately tear itself apart. Instead, most of the material will initially form a thin, rotationally supported, protostellar disk. On page 1519 of this issue, Pérez et al. (2) present a high-resolution image of such a disk, using the Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). ...

[Perspective] Constraining lithospheric flow
The motion of Earth's tectonic plates?the lithosphere?is driven by the subduction of relatively cold and dense oceanic plates into the mantle. The resulting forces drive the motions of continental plates, but the manner in which this happens depends on the effective viscosities of the lithosphere and mantle. On page 1515 of this issue, Liu and Hasterok (1) discuss a novel method of constraining viscosities of the lithosphere from geophysical data. Author: Boris J. P. Kaus

[Perspective] Social memory goes viral
It is a curious feature of studies of recognition memory that the experimental subjects are almost always tested alone. They may be asked to scan a set of landscape pictures and later recognize having seen them before or to study a set of words or faces. For a social species such as ourselves?and mammals in general?being tested alone is a curious state of affairs. Social memory, social comparisons, and reciprocity have been a major driving force in brain evolution (1), and the effect of social i...

[Perspective] Immune receptor for pathogenic ?-synuclein
In neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, specific proteins misfold into ? sheet?rich conformations that aggregate. For Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia, the hallmark pathology is neuronal inclusions of aggregated ?-synuclein called Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. The spreading of these lesions in the brain is at least partly the result of prionlike self-propagation and cell-to-cell transfer of pathogenic ?-synuclein assemblies (1). Inoculation o...

[Perspective] Bee happy
In his book, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, Charles Darwin noted that ?Even insects express anger, terror, jealousy, and love by their stridulation.? Almost 150 years later, spurred by an interest in the evolutionary roots of emotional (affective) processes and their underlying mechanisms, there has been a sudden upsurge of research into the question of whether insects and other invertebrates may indeed have emotion-like states (1?4). Recent work has focused on negative affec...

[Policy Forum] Growing pains for global monitoring of societal events
There have been serious efforts over the past 40 years to use newspaper articles to create global-scale databases of events occurring in every corner of the world, to help understand and shape responses to global problems. Although most have been limited by the technology of the time (1) [see supplementary materials (SM)], two recent groundbreaking projects to provide global, real-time ?event data? that take advantage of automated coding from news media have gained widespread recognition: Intern...

[Book Review] Rethinking the arrow of time
Is time discrete or continuous? What is the smallest measurement of time that we can make? And does time actually pass faster as we age, or is it just our perception? You may consider such questions to be metaphysical or philosophical, but in Now: The Physics of Time Richard Muller ponders these and other questions through the lens of a number of major 20th century physics discoveries. In doing so, Muller successfully introduces and describes most, if not all, of the key elements in an undergrad...

[Book Review] Leveling up
"I am hungry for change?for developments in hierarchy theory from the younger generation," writes Niles Eldredge in the opening pages of Evolutionary Theory. The edited volume provides a contemporary selection of historical, conceptual, and empirical essays on the hierarchy theory of evolution that Eldredge and his collaborators hope will bring about renewed enthusiasm for the theory in evolutionary biology circles. Author: Bengt Autzen

[Report] High-resolution lithosphere viscosity and dynamics revealed by magne...
An accurate viscosity structure is critical to truthfully modeling lithosphere dynamics. Here, we report an attempt to infer the effective lithospheric viscosity from a high-resolution magnetotelluric (MT) survey across the western United States. The high sensitivity of MT fields to the presence of electrically conductive fluids makes it a promising proxy for determining mechanical strength variations throughout the lithosphere. We demonstrate how a viscosity structure, approximated from electri...

[Report] Ballistic miniband conduction in a graphene superlattice
Rational design of long-period artificial lattices yields effects unavailable in simple solids. The moiré pattern in highly aligned graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures is a lateral superlattice with high electron mobility and an unusual electronic dispersion whose miniband edges and saddle points can be reached by electrostatic gating. We investigated the dynamics of electrons in moiré minibands by measuring ballistic transport between adjacent local contacts in a magnetic f...

[Report] Unexpected rewards induce dopamine-dependent positive emotion?like s...
Whether invertebrates exhibit positive emotion?like states and what mechanisms underlie such states remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that bumblebees exhibit dopamine-dependent positive emotion?like states across behavioral contexts. After training with one rewarding and one unrewarding cue, bees that received pretest sucrose responded in a positive manner toward ambiguous cues. In a second experiment, pretest consumption of sucrose solution resulted in a shorter time to reinitiate foragi...

[Report] Ventral CA1 neurons store social memory
The medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, has been implicated in social memory. However, it remains unknown which parts of these brain regions and their circuits hold social memory. Here, we show that ventral hippocampal CA1 (vCA1) neurons of a mouse and their projections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell play a necessary and sufficient role in social memory. Both the proportion of activated vCA1 cells and the strength and stability of the responding cells are greater in response to a ...

[Report] Cyclin A2 is an RNA binding protein that controls Mre11 mRNA transla...
Cyclin A2 activates the cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk1 and Cdk2 and is expressed at elevated levels from S phase until early mitosis. We found that mutant mice that cannot elevate cyclin A2 are chromosomally unstable and tumor-prone. Underlying the chromosomal instability is a failure to up-regulate the meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11) nuclease in S phase, which leads to impaired resolution of stalled replication forks, insufficient repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, and improper segregation o...

[Report] Drosophila insulin release is triggered by adipose Stunted ligand to...
Animals adapt their growth rate and body size to available nutrients by a general modulation of insulin?insulin-like growth factor signaling. In Drosophila, dietary amino acids promote the release in the hemolymph of brain insulin-like peptides (Dilps), which in turn activate systemic organ growth. Dilp secretion by insulin-producing cells involves a relay through unknown cytokines produced by fat cells. Here, we identify Methuselah (Mth) as a secretin-incretin receptor subfamily member required...

Can You Blame Your Headaches on Your Thyroid?
People with migraines had 40 percent higher risk of thyroid problems, study suggests

Flagging Flu-Shot Rate Worries CDC
Decline among vulnerable older adults is of particular concern

Acne's Silver Lining: Slower Aging of the Skin?
Twins study finds white blood cells of sibling with acne seem to age less rapidly

Exercise May Not Lower Women's Risk of MS
Study shows no benefit, but staying active can help ease disease symptoms, experts say

'The Pill' May Raise Depression Risk
Study also ties hormonal patches, IUDs to greater antidepressant use, especially in teens

Congress Agrees to More Zika Funding
Part of larger spending package to keep federal government running into December

Ketamine May Treat Migraine, Chronic Pain
Ketamine, typically thought of as an anesthesia medicine, is stirring interest among pain management specialists as a way to treat migraines and chronic pain.

FDA Asks Public: What Is 'Healthy Food'?
Agency seeks input from Americans on defining what is considered nutritious

A Happy Spouse May Keep You Healthy
Your husband or wife can encourage good lifestyle habits, researchers say

Biological Clock: Why Some Age Faster Than Others
New research could help explain why healthy living isn't always enough

Babies With Cleft Lip: Normal Adulthood Likely
However, cleft palate was associated with increased risk for developmental problems

Spare Tire: Worse for Heart Than Love Handles?
Study links deep belly fat to greater odds for cardiovascular risk factors

Exercise Speeds Seniors' Recovery From Disability
Walking regimen also curbs risk of injury in the first place, study finds

Colonoscopy After 75 May Not Be Worth It
But, expert says age shouldn't be only criterion for screening for colon cancer

Is Morning Sickness a Good Thing?
Women who experienced nausea, vomiting had 50 to 75 percent lower risk of pregnancy loss, study finds


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Trilobites: In Decades Old Slides, Drops of Blood and Hints of Malaria?s Path
DNA studies help reveal that some malaria strains closely followed the migrations of people: from India to Europe and then from Europe to the Americas.

Children Who Get Zika After Birth Tend Not to Fall Seriously Ill, Study Finds
A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention involving teenagers and toddlers was a rare bright spot in the epidemic.

Storytelling in the Virtual Age at FoST Fest
The first Future of StoryTelling Festival will offer participants virtual reality, immersive theater and other interactive experiences.

Q&A: Organic Milk Will Wait and Wait for You
A different, hotter pasteurization process helps explain why organic milk has a longer shelf life than the other stuff.

Scientists Inspect the Great Barrier Reef, From 28,000 Feet Above
A NASA flying laboratory is using a specially designed sensor in a search for answers about what is killing large sections of the world?s coral reefs.

To the Moon, North Korea? Or Does a Rocket Have a Darker Aim?
The North explains a rocket engine test as a moonshot, but intelligence agencies are exploring another option: the beginnings of a missile that could reach the American mainland.



































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