See new books on the following topics:

Aging -- Alzheimer's -- Anti-Aging -- Aubrey de Grey Ideas -- Biomedical Nanotechnology -- Brain Aging -- Caloric Restriction -- Cancer -- Cardiovascular Health -- Cryonics -- Dementia -- Diabetes -- Estrogen -- Genetics of Aging and Health -- Geriatrics -- Growth Hormone -- Hormones -- Human Longevity -- Immortality -- Life Expectancy -- Life Extension -- Menopause -- Mortality -- Nursing -- Population Aging -- Regenerative Medicine -- Rejuvenation -- Resveratrol -- SENS: Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence -- Stem Cell Therapy -- Supplements -- Testosterone -- Vitamins.



Aging, Longevity and Health in the News

Sunbed study highlights cancer risk
Sunbed users are still at risk of skin cancer even if they do not burn their skin, according to a new study by Dundee University.


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Well: Don?t Catch What Ails Your House
It doesn?t take a flood to encourage the growth of mold in a home. A moist environment will do. A runny nose, coughing and all the rest typically follow.








Building a Robot With Human Touch
Robots still lack a critical element that will keep them from eclipsing most human capabilities anytime soon: a well-developed sense of touch.








Childhood Diet Habits Set in Infancy, Studies Suggest
Research published in the journal Pediatrics indicates that early preferences for fruits and vegetables or, conversely, sugary drinks last into age 6.








Well: Birth Weight and Diabetes
African-Americans born at low birth weight are at an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes later in life, a new study has found.








Paleontology: The Oldest Known Muscle Tissues Are Found
The oldest known muscle tissues have been found, researchers report, in the fossilized tissues of a soft-bodied creature that shares a common ancestor with modern sea anemones, jellyfish and corals.


Books: Guiding a Husband and a Mother Through Alzheimer?s at the Same Time
Meryl Comer has written a heartbreaking account of caring for both her husband, who has been debilitated by early-onset Alzheimer?s disease, and her mother, who has the late-onset variety.








Coverage for End-of-Life Talks Gaining Ground
Medicare may cover advance care planning that was once decried as ?death panels,? and some private insurers are not waiting for the political process.








Parents arrested over son's cancer treatment
British family brought 5-year-old Ashya to Spain for new brain tumor treatment, and ended up in jail

Could watching action movies make you fat?
Certain types of shows encourage more high-calorie snacking than others; researchers explain why

Are hazmat suits for Ebola counterproductive?
The image of health care workers in pressurized, full-body suits could fuel panic and may not be needed, some experts say

Obese children face serious health risk
Obese children are at nearly six times higher risk for hypertension than children who are normal weight, according to German study. Also, tea drinkers are likely to be healthier than coffee drinkers. Brian Webb has some of the day's top health stories.

iPads improve language skills in autistic kids
A study finds regular use of personal tablets may help severely autistic children learn and retain more words

Double Mastectomy Doesn't Boost Survival: Study
The results raise concerns about a riskier, potentially unnecessary operation that increasing numbers of women with breast cancer are choosing.








EXCLUSIVE: Ebola Survivor Kent Brantly Reveals Near-Death Ordeal
American Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly told NBC News in an exclusive interview that he felt like he was about to die in a hospital in Liberia.








Put Down That Bread! Science Backs Up Low-Carb Diet
A low-carb diet is better for losing weight and may also be better for lowering the risk of heart disease than a low-fat diet, a new study finds.








Poverty Blamed for Return of Rickets, Gout
A "toxic combination" of poor wage growth and higher food prices has led to the return of Victorian-era diseases such as rickets and gout to Britain.



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Languages are being wiped out by economic growth
Himalayas and tropical regions likely next hotspots for language extinction

Eating More Fruit Cuts Heart Disease Risk: Study
Eating fruit every day lowers the risk of getting heart and stroke problems by up to 40%, researchers say.

Is Breakfast Really Your Most Important Meal?
Your mother might've told you that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Some recent reports, though, might make you think Mom?s take on breakfast is about as credible as other old wives? tales.

Biggest Ever Weekly Rise in Ebola Cases, U.N. Agency Says
About 500 new infections reported across West Africa, including first case in Senegal

New tuberculosis blood test in children: reliable, highly specific
A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. The test features excellent specificity, a similar sensitivity as culture tests in combination with speed of a blood test. The promising findings are a major advance for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, particularly in tuberculosis-endemic regions.

Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer
One in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine -- identified by their GP testing their urine -- transpired to have bladder cancer, researchers report. The figure was around half of those who had visible blood in their urine -- the best known indicator of bladder cancer. However, it was still higher than figures for other potential symptoms of bladder cancer that warrant further investigation.

Sniffing-out smell of disease in feces: 'Electronic nose' for rapid detection...
A fast-sensitive "electronic-nose" for sniffing the highly infectious bacteria C-diff, that causes diarrhea, temperature and stomach cramps, has been developed.

Carcinogenic role of protein in liver decoded
The human protein EGFR controls cell growth. It has mutated in case of many cancer cells or exists in excessive numbers. For this reason it serves as a point of attack for target-oriented therapies. A study group has now discovered that the risk of this protein does not -- as previously assumed -- depend on its presence within the tumor cell, but rather from its activity in the cells adjacent to the tumor.

Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations
Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. A characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from many highly-sensitive zones on the skin. According to researchers, this branching allows first-order tactile neurons not only to send signals to the brain that something has touched the skin, but also process geometric data about the object touching...

New way to diagnose malaria by detecting parasite's waste in infected blood c...
A technique that can detect malarial parasite's waste in infected blood cells has been developed by researchers. "There is real potential to make this into a field-deployable system, especially since you don't need any kind of labels or dye. It's based on a naturally occurring biomarker that does not require any biochemical processing of samples" says one of the senior authors of a paper.

Antarctic sea level rising faster than global rate
A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2cm more than the global average of 6cm. Researchers detected the rapid rise in sea-level by studying satellite scans of a region that spans more than a million square kilometers. The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet and the thinning of floating ice shelves has contributed an excess of around 350 gigatonnes of freshwater to the s...

Wine only protects against cardiovascular disease in people who exercise, stu...
Wine only protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people who exercise, according to results from the a study. Evidence suggesting that mild to moderate consumption of wine protects against cardiovascular disease has been accumulating since the early 1990s. In particular, retrospective studies have found that wine increases levels of HDL, the "good" cholesterol. But until now there has been no long-term, prospective, randomised study comparing the effects of red and white wine on HDL cho...

Drinking tea reduces non-cardiovascular mortality by 24 percent, study finds
Drinking tea reduces non-cardiovascular mortality by 24 percent, reveals a study in 131,000 people. "Tea has antioxidants which may provide survival benefits. Tea drinkers also have healthier lifestyles so does tea drinking reflect a particular person profile or is it tea, per se, that improves outcomes -- for me that remains an open question. Pending the answer to that question, I think that you could fairly honestly recommend tea drinking rather than coffee drinking and even rather than not dr...

Factor in naked mole rat's cells enhances protein integrity
A factor in naked mole rat cells could be one of the secrets to how the rodent defies aging, researchers say. Naked mole rats, which burrow through underground tunnels in their native East Africa, are nearly hairless rodents. They live as long as 32 years. Naked mole rats maintain cancer-free good health and reproductive potential well into their third decade of life.

Efficacy of new gene therapy approach for toxin exposures shown in mouse study
Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods, new research shows. "We envision this treatment approach having a broad range of applications such as protecting military personnel from biothreat agents or protecting the public from other toxin-mediated diseases such as C. difficile and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections," said the lead researcher.

Giant balloon may soon rise over the desert, carrying aloft cutting-edge tele...
In a few days, a balloon-borne telescope sensitive to the polarization of high-energy ?hard? X rays will ascend to the edge of the atmosphere above Fort Sumner, N.M., to stare fixedly at black holes and other exotic astronomical objects. It will be carried aloft by a stratospheric balloon that will expand to a sphere large enough to hold a 747 jetliner the float height of 120,000 feet, three times the height at which commercial aircraft fly and on the edge of Earth?s atmosphere. Launching the ba...

Evidence mounting that older adults who volunteer are happier, healthier
Older adults who stay active by volunteering are getting more out of it than just an altruistic feeling -- they are receiving a health boost too, researchers report. Volunteering is associated with reductions in symptoms of depression, better overall health, fewer functional limitations, and greater longevity.

Intervention needed for survivors of childhood burns
Adults who have been hospitalized for a burn as a child experience higher than usual rates of depression and suicidal thoughts, according to new research. A 30-year follow up of childhood burns victims has found that 42% of people surveyed had suffered some form of mental illness and 30% suffered depression at some stage in their lives.

Building a Robot With Human Touch
Robots still lack a critical element that will keep them from eclipsing most human capabilities anytime soon: a well-developed sense of touch.








Seeing Discolored Lawns, California Businesses Apply Dab of Green
In California, more homeowners are experimenting with dyeing their lawns to keep them bright shades of green.


Paleontology: The Oldest Known Muscle Tissues Are Found
The oldest known muscle tissues have been found, researchers report, in the fossilized tissues of a soft-bodied creature that shares a common ancestor with modern sea anemones, jellyfish and corals.








Q&A: Why Do Slugs Risk Crossing the Road?
The two big impetuses for sluggish movement are food-seeking and the search for potential mates.








Books: Guiding a Husband and a Mother Through Alzheimer?s at the Same Time
Meryl Comer has written a heartbreaking account of caring for both her husband, who has been debilitated by early-onset Alzheimer?s disease, and her mother, who has the late-onset variety.








SolarWorld Americas Says Hackers in China Stole Documents
An Oregon-based solar company is proposing that punitive tariffs be imposed on Chinese manufacturers that have benefited from online espionage.


Dot Earth Blog: Is Rational Water Management Finally Emerging in Dry California?
California legislators, and farmers, begin to adjust well-drilling practices to suit a drier reality.










































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