See new books on the following topics:

Aging -- Alzheimer's -- Anti-Aging -- Aubrey de Grey Ideas -- Biomedical Nanotechnology -- Brain Aging -- Caloric Restriction -- Cancer -- Cardiovascular Health -- Cryonics -- Dementia -- Diabetes -- Estrogen -- Genetics of Aging and Health -- Geriatrics -- Growth Hormone -- Hormones -- Human Longevity -- Immortality -- Life Expectancy -- Life Extension -- Menopause -- Mortality -- Nursing -- Population Aging -- Regenerative Medicine -- Rejuvenation -- Resveratrol -- SENS: Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence -- Stem Cell Therapy -- Supplements -- Testosterone -- Vitamins.



Aging, Longevity and Health in the News

Middle-aged drinking 'impairs memory'
Problem drinking in middle age doubles the risk of memory loss in later life, research suggests.

Six seconds 'can transform health'
Short six-second bursts of vigorous exercise have the potential to transform the health of elderly people, say researchers.


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Well: Running 5 Minutes a Day Has Long-Lasting Benefits
Even small amounts of vigorous exercise could significantly lower a person?s risk of dying prematurely, according to a large-scale new study of exercise and mortality.








Osteopathic Schools Turn Out Nearly a Third of All Med School Grads
With a looming shortage of M.D.s, osteopathic medicine is shedding its second-tier image. And yes, D.O.s are real doctors.








Surgeon General Calls for Action to Reduce Skin Cancer Rate
In a report released Tuesday, Dr. Boris D. Lushniak, the acting surgeon general, said action needed to be taken to slow the incidence of skin cancer, the most diagnosed form of cancer nationwide.


Well: Rustle, Tingle, Relax: The Compelling World of A.S.M.R.
Videos that evoke the tingling sensation of the ?autonomous sensory meridian response? are popular on the Web, but scientists are only beginning to understand what might be involved.








Books: Book Review: ?The Norm Chronicles?
?The Norm Chronicles: Stories and Numbers About Danger and Death? is a kinetic trip through the percentages of risk and the primacy of perceptions.








The New Old Age Blog: A New Resource About Parkinson?s
A new website hosts a directory of movement disorder specialists.








Pregnancy for Pay: A Surrogacy Agency That Delivered Heartache
As unregulated surrogacy agencies proliferate, the story of Planet Hospital stands as a cautionary tale about their ability to prey on vulnerable clients who do not notice the red flags.








If there's a gene for happiness, you may find it here
Scientists say one country may hold the key to genetic clues for happiness

Dubai offers kids gold to lose weight
A program that rewards residents in the emirate for shedding pounds is drawing criticism for encouraging children to participate

Running reduces risk of heart disease death, study finds
Researchers found adults who ran consistently, even just for a few minutes, lowered their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. Plus, a new study finds children with special needs benefit from peers with strong language skills. Marlie Hall has some of your day?s top health stories.

?Running could add years to your life
Study finds runners live longer than non-runners -- and you don't have to run fast or far to see the benefits

Handshake vs. fist bump: Which spreads more germs?
Researchers in the UK found a fist bump spread fewer germs than shaking someone's hand or giving a high-five. Plus, childhood cancer survivors may have an increased risk for heart disease, diabetes and stroke. Danielle Nottingham reports on the day's top health stories.

Fruits and Veggies: All You Need is Five
If all you want to do is lower your risk of dying soon, just eat five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, researchers say.








Soda Loses Fizz: Two-Thirds Avoid Pop
The bubble has burst for soft drinks, with two-thirds of Americans saying they're actively avoiding drinking the beverage.








Run for Your Life: 5 Minutes a Day May Be All You Need
Running as little as 5 to 10 minutes per day could greatly reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke.








Boy Fighting Inoperable Tumor Gets Birthday Wish: Lots of Mail
Danny Nickerson?s simple birthday request has unleashed an amazing response, and 100,000 letters have been delivered to the 6-year-old so far.



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Diabetes May Raise Risk for Head and Neck Cancer
The risk for head and neck cancer is higher in people with diabetes than in those without diabetes, according to a new study.

Running Could Add 3 Years to Your Lifespan
Just 5 to 10 minutes a day seems to bring benefits, study says

Healthy 'Brown Fat' May Cut Odds for Obesity, Diabetes
Study confirmed it helps regulate blood sugar levels, increases insulin sensitivity in people with more of it

Preemies May Have Higher Risk of Blood Clots, Even as Adults
Odds are small, but family, doctors should keep possibility in mind, researchers say

Microscopic rowing -- without a cox
New research shows that the whip-like appendages on many types of cells are able to synchronize their movements solely through interactions with the fluid that surrounds them.

Mortality rates increase due to extreme heat and cold
When temperatures are extremely high or low, there is a significant increase in the number of deaths caused by heart failure or stroke. This has been confirmed by epidemiological studies.

Healthy lifestyle may buffer against stress-related cell aging
A new study shows that while the impact of life?s stressors accumulate overtime and accelerate cellular aging, these negative effects may be reduced by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising and sleeping well.

NASA long-lived Mars Opportunity rover passes 25 miles of driving
NASA's Opportunity Mars rover, which landed on the Red Planet in 2004, now holds the off-Earth roving distance record after accruing 25 miles (40 kilometers) of driving. The previous record was held by the Soviet Union's Lunokhod 2 rover.

Mineral magic? Common mineral capable of making and breaking bonds
Researchers have demonstrated how a common mineral acts as a catalysts for specific hydrothermal organic reactions -- negating the need for toxic solvents or expensive reagents.

Electronic screening tool to triage teenagers and risk of substance misuse
An electronic screening tool that starts with a single question to assess the frequency of substance misuse appears to be an easy way to screen teenagers who visited a physician for routine medical care.

Endurance runners more likely to die of heat stroke than heart condition
Heat stroke is 10 times more likely than cardiac events to be life-threatening for runners during endurance races in warm climates, according to a new study. The authors noted the findings may play a role in the ongoing debate over pre-participation ECG screenings for preventing sudden death in athletes by offering a new perspective on the greatest health risk for runners.

Running reduces risk of death regardless of duration, speed
Running for only a few minutes a day or at slow speeds may significantly reduce a person's risk of death from cardiovascular disease compared to someone who does not run, according to a new study.

Glucose 'control switch' in the brain key to both types of diabetes
Researchers have pinpointed a mechanism in part of the brain that is key to sensing glucose levels in the blood, linking it to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Impact of Deepwater Horizon oil spill on coral is deeper and broader than pre...
A new discovery of two additional coral communities showing signs of damage from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill expands the impact footprint of the 2010 spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Facial features are the key to first impressions
A new study shows that it is possible to accurately predict first impressions using measurements of physical features in everyday images of faces, such as those found on social media.

Parents need to talk to their children about school bus safety at the start o...
According to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, from 2001 through 2010, 1,368 people died in school transportation-related crashes?an average of 137 fatalities per year.

Golden-C: A new mango drink enriched with antioxidants from mas cotek
Researchers have enhanced the antioxidants present in mango fruit drink by adding the extracts of naturally occuring traditional herbs in Malaysia.

Six reasons for headaches in school-age children and how parents can help rel...
As the school year approaches and begins, many parents may start to hear their children complain about headaches.

New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases
Bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body's normal proteins into a state that's linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig's disease.

New meaning to refrigerator magnets: Magnets may act as wireless cooling agents
The magnets cluttering the face of your refrigerator may one day be used as cooling agents, according to a new theory. A magnetically driven refrigerator would require no moving parts, unlike conventional iceboxes that pump fluid through a set of pipes to keep things cool.

Children with disabilities benefit from classroom inclusion
The secret to boosting the language skills of preschoolers with disabilities may be to put them in classrooms with typically developing peers, a new study finds.

Google searches may hold key to future market crashes, researchers find
A team of researchers has developed a method to automatically identify topics that people search for on Google before subsequent stock market falls.

Motivation explains disconnect between testing, real-life functioning for sen...
A psychology researcher is proposing a new theory to explain why older adults show declining cognitive ability with age, but don't necessarily show declines in the workplace or daily life. One key appears to be how motivated older adults are to maintain focus on cognitive tasks.

Surgeon General Calls for Action to Reduce Skin Cancer Rate
In a report released Tuesday, Dr. Boris D. Lushniak, the acting surgeon general, said action needed to be taken to slow the incidence of skin cancer, the most diagnosed form of cancer nationwide.








Well: Rustle, Tingle, Relax: The Compelling World of A.S.M.R.
Videos that evoke the tingling sensation of the ?autonomous sensory meridian response? are popular on the Web, but scientists are only beginning to understand what might be involved.








Out of Wreckage, Lives Emerge
Reports give new details of not only the treasure discovered from the S.S. Central America, which sank more than 150 years ago, but also of the items that speak of the lives lost.








Books: Book Review: ?The Norm Chronicles?
?The Norm Chronicles: Stories and Numbers About Danger and Death? is a kinetic trip through the percentages of risk and the primacy of perceptions.








Well: A Sleep Apnea Test Without a Night in the Hospital
Take-home sleep tests, self-administered in more realistic settings, without myriad wires and sensors, promise more accurate results for people who may have sleep apnea or other conditions.








In Search for Killer, DNA Sweep Exposes Intimate Family Secrets in Italy
The search for the killer in a sensational murder case revealed personal details about a suspect and set off a debate about the risks of privacy violations in DNA searches.










































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